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Home » What’s New » Gas Permeable Lenses: Do They Make Sense for You?

Gas Permeable Lenses: Do They Make Sense for You?

 

Although soft contacts are most often used, another less familiar type of contact lenses exists: rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, sometimes called oxygen permeable lenses.

Actually, hard lenses are a more modern technology than soft lenses, which are longer-lasting, offer better vision quality, and offer better durability. Additionally RGP lenses can also be cheaper in the long run than soft lenses. Certainly, its advised to first consult with an optometrist to decide whether GPs suit your lifestyle. Our optometry practice can help you figure out whether you’re a candidate for hard lenses.

Since a GP is made of stiff material, it does a good job of retaining its form when you blink, which tends to afford crisper vision than the average soft lens. Furthermore RGPs are especially long-lasting. Although they can break if stepped on, they don’t tear easily like soft lenses. Further, because they're made of substances that don't include water, proteins and lipids from your tears won't adhere to RGPs as easily as they will to soft lenses. Those of you who are extra fussy about vision quality will most likely opt for RGPs.

One major drawback of GPs is that they must be worn regularly to achieve optimum comfort. Additionally, some people experience “spectacle blur” with RGPs, which is when vision is blurry when the lenses are removed even while still wearing glasses. Although the effect is not permanent, it can necessitate full-time GP wear.

If you're checking out hard lenses, make sure to first speak to your eye doctor to ascertain if you really are a suitable candidate. You never know…hard lenses might be the perfect answer for you!